FAQ

Intervention Through Collaboration

Frequently Asked Questions

Here we have compiled a list of the most frequently asked questions. 

FAQ

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is interrupted, blocked or reduced. Without proper blood flow, part of the brain is deprived of oxygen nerve cells in the affected area of the brain cant function and will become damaged. Learn More: http://www.strokecog.ie/?page_id=264
The StrokeCog study, led by Professor Anne Hickey at RCSI in partnership with colleagues in Beaumont Hospital and the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), involves modelling and modifying the consequences of stroke-related cognitive impairment through an intervention.
Rehabilitation of cognitive difficulties has received very little attention compared with physical rehabilitation. The StrokeCog study aims to address the lack of research in this area.
Many are aware of the physical disabilities after stroke but are less aware of the cognitive problems that can arise. These can include impaired memory and concentration. Often, stroke survivors can find these problems the most debilitating consequences. Cognitive impairment after stroke is an under-researched topic internationally and is a critical area to better understand. While cognitive impairment after stroke is frequently mild or moderate, one in ten people can develop dementia after their first stroke, and more than one in three people who have a recurrent stroke may develop dementia.